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Overclock your Ryzen CPU from Linux

So you’ve probably heard of Ryzen Master?

Except you happen to use Linux. What’s there to do?
Well with this little python application and the help of MSR’s (Model Specific Registers) on Ryzen CPU’s you can manually overclock your Ryzen processor. While it’s running!

1. Load 2 kernel modules

These should come as standard on any distro

sudo modprobe msr cpuid

2. Download the following repo

git clone https://github.com/r4m0n/ZenStates-Linux.git

Now once that’s done it’s time to get well acquainted with your processor

3. Run zenstates

sudo ./zenstates.py  -l

For a 1700X on stock settings you should see something like this

P0 - Enabled - FID = 88 - DID = 8 - VID = 20 - Ratio = 34.00 - vCore = 1.35000
P1 - Enabled - FID = 78 - DID = 8 - VID = 2C - Ratio = 30.00 - vCore = 1.27500
P2 - Enabled - FID = 84 - DID = C - VID = 68 - Ratio = 22.00 - vCore = 0.90000
P3 - Disabled
P4 - Disabled
P5 - Disabled
P6 - Disabled
P7 - Disabled
C6 State - Package - Enabled
C6 State - Core - Enabled

For a stock 1800X it looks like this:

P0 - Enabled - FID = 90 - DID = 8 - VID = 20 - Ratio = 36.00 - vCore = 1.35000
P1 - Enabled - FID = 80 - DID = 8 - VID = 2C - Ratio = 32.00 - vCore = 1.27500
P2 - Enabled - FID = 84 - DID = C - VID = 68 - Ratio = 22.00 - vCore = 0.90000
P3 - Disabled
P4 - Disabled
P5 - Disabled
P6 - Disabled
P7 - Disabled
C6 State - Package - Enabled
C6 State - Core - Enabled

Most Ryzen CPU’s only seem to support P-states P0, P1 and P2, keep this in mind.

All values are set in hexadecimal values and require a bit of thought and math to use safely

YOU CAN TOTALLY BREAK THINGS HERE!

You and only you the reader take responsibility for performing any of the actions described here on your system.
Don’t come crying to me if you entered the wrong values and flames came shooting out of your Hardware.

Now what are some of the numbers we see above?

  • FID – Frequency ID in Hexadecimal
  • VID – Voltage ID in Hexadecimal
  • DID – Divisor ID in Hexadecimal
  • Ratio - CPU Clock Ratio * 100Mhz to get Full CPU base frequency
  • vCore - The actual CPU base voltage (This will vary with Line Load)

This in all works very similar to what you see in your BIOS P-states settings under the AMD CBS menu.

For a standard DID value of 8 the FID value is calculated as follows:

(CPU ratio * 4) = FID(Decimal)

So lets take an example for 3900Mhz.
This means we want a ratio of 39.

39 *4 = 156

Convert 156 to Hex = 9C

To help you here is a table of all the common VID’s, and FID’s

FID

FID Base Clock (MHz)
90 3600
91 3625
92 3650
93 3675
94 3700
95 3725
96 3750
97 3775
98 3800
99 3825
9a 3850
9b 3875
9c 3900
9d 3925
9e 3950
9f 3975
a0 4000
a1 4025
a2 4050
a3 4075
a4 4100

VID

VID Voltage (V)
30 1.2500
2f 1.2560
2e 1.2562
2d 1.2680
2c 1.2750
2b 1.2812
2a 1.2870
29 1.2930
28 1.3000
27 1.3062
26 1.3125
25 1.3180
24 1.3250
23 1.3312
22 1.3375
21 1.3430
20 1.3500
1f 1.3560
1e 1.3625
1d 1.3680
1c 1.3750
1b 1.3812
1a 1.3875
19 1.3937
18 1.4000
17 1.4060
16 1.4125
15 1.4180
14 1.4250
13 1.4321
12 1.4375
11 1.4430
10 1.4500

Some clocks based on binning expectations

Ryzen 7 1700

97% reach 3.8GHz @ 1.376V
70% reach 3.9GHz @ 1.408V
20% reach 4.0GHz @ 1.440V

Ryzen 7 1700X

100% reach 3.8GHz @ 1.360V
77% reach 3.9GHz @ 1.392V
33% reach 4.0GHz @ 1.424V

Ryzen 7 1800X

100% reach 3.8GHz (assumed)
97% reach 3.9GHz @ 1.376V
67% reach 4.0GHz @ 1.408V
20% reach 4.1GHz @ 1.440V

For most 1700X I have simply set both P0 and P1 to 3800MHz with the following settings, yours may differ. And 1.35V is generally safe for 3.8Ghz.
Obviously all of these have to be executed as root with the msr and cpuid modules loaded.

P0 = 3.800GHz, 1.3500v

./zenstates.py -p 0 -f 98 -d 8 -v 20

P1 = 3.800GHz, 1.3500v

./zenstates.py -p 1 -f 98 -d 8 -v 20

P2 = 2.200GHz, 0.9000v (The Power saving Idle state)

./zenstates.py -p 2 -f 84 -d C -v 68

Now if you want to have your system load these settings at startup you can create a simple systemd service as follows:

First ensure that the necessary modules are loaded:

sudoedit /etc/modules-load.d/cpu.conf

Now in this file simply enter these two lines and save it.

msr
cpuid

This will ensure that your kernel loads these two modules at startup.

First copy zenstates.py from the local directory to /usr/local/bin/

sudo cp ./zenstates.py /usr/local/bin/

Then make sure it’s still executable

sudo chmod +x /usr/local/bin/zenstates.py

Now create our shell script that will invoke zenstates.py in /usr/local/bin

sudoedit /usr/local/bin/enable-pstates

Add the following lines and save it

#!/bin/sh
## The default configuration incase you want to revert
#       P0 - Enabled - FID = 88 - DID = 8 - VID = 20 - Ratio = 34.00 - vCore = 1.35000
#       P1 - Enabled - FID = 78 - DID = 8 - VID = 2C - Ratio = 30.00 - vCore = 1.27500
#       P2 - Enabled - FID = 84 - DID = C - VID = 68 - Ratio = 22.00 - vCore = 0.90000

## P0 = 3.800GHz, 1.3500v
zenstates.py -p 0 -f 98 -d 8 -v 20

## P1 = 3.800GHz, 1.3500v
zenstates.py -p 1 -f 98 -d 8 -v 20

## P2 = 2.200GHz, 0.9000v
zenstates.py -p 2 -f 84 -d C -v 68

## List the result.
zenstates.py -l

Now make the script executable

sudo chmod +x /usr/loca/bin/enable-pstates

Next up create a new file for our systemd service

sudoedit /etc/systemd/system/ryzen-overclock.service

This will be our systemd service file that will get tell systemd to run our small bash script very early at boot for maximum benefit

[Unit]
Description=Ryzen Overclock
DefaultDependencies=no
After=sysinit.target local-fs.target
Before=basic.target

[Service]
Type=oneshot
ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/enable-pstates

[Install]
WantedBy=basic.target

Now reload your systemd services for good measure

sudo systemctl daemon-reload

And enable the service to run at startup

sudo systemctl enable ryzen-overclock

You can now either reboot or manually start the service via systemctl and enjoy your overclock. :smiley:

sudo systemctl start ryzen-overclock

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Something of note to add to this:

This works on some remote dedicated root servers (Metal as a Service). You can use it to get extra performance or brick machines, but you will be held liable for doing so.

I’ve seen a few cases where people did so and had to cover the hardware damages due. :wink:

I take no responsibility for what you do with this.

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