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Linux, Ruby, and Windows Appreciation Thread

linux
windows
glorious
#1

In the spirit of the OMG I HATE LINUX/WINDOWS threads, but in a different light, this is going to be an appreciation. @Yoray building off your success, fam :wink:

Why one thread instead of two separate threads? Well, it’s simple, really:

Why not both?

Windows has strengths over Linux and Linux has strengths over Windows. You can recognize this and utilize both systems, often simultaneously (more on that, later).

First, it’s not Mac, AMIRITE?!

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This was the first Internet joke (now called a “meme”) I saw that was opening and harshly bashing Apple products. I found it in 2010 or 2011, I think. I love it, still do to this day.

Second, while Windows is far from perfect, Microsoft developer tools have been top notch for quite some time. Lately, they’ve introduced the cross platform build options. You can configure Visual Studio and VS Code to develop your system locally and build it on a remote Linux server. It’s recommended to do through ssh, but other tools are offered as well.

With the new Windows terminal, you’ll have a legit Linux shell, PowerShell, and Windows Terminal (NOT CMD, they have evolved) running freely in your Windows box.

For deploying software, it’s hard to beat a headless Linux system. Lightweight and easily configurable, you can deploy and run for years without patching or rebooting (not recommended). With so many things being “in the browser” today, the development environment doesn’t really matter, but the host is generally going to be some sort of Linux server for a lightweight solution that uses minimal resources.

Last, I’ll say that Azure kicks some serious butt in the VPC space. Their UI is vastly superior to AWS, in my opinion, and they have a wide range of products that include Windows and Linux, Functions, collaboration, database, source code management, and containerization.

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#2

Linux has made amazing strides in the past year or two, and that’s mostly in the area of running windows software. And we’ve also see it the other way around recently with windows making strides to run linux tools. I think both of these things are great!

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#3

I appreciate the fact that I don’t have to configure kernel to install MS Visual Studio Code on my L’Distro

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#4

VS Code by far is the best GUI text editor I have tried.

@AdminDev :kissing_heart:

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#5

I just had to do an update of a wiki system on a customers Server. Installed on Debian 6 Years ago, no one touched it since. Within 3 hours and some work this server is now back on debian stable with all the latest updates. No shutdown in between was needed (though done anyways for the kernel updates). Ran for 6 years without someone giving a damn. And will probably do 6 more.

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#6

I like how both try to add features, rather than removing them

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#7

Agreed. Even though my coding skills are that of a beginner, I find it very pleasing to use and it is the best product most functional product that MS has released since Win itself.

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#8

I appreciate how windows doesnt break if i don’t mess with it.

I like how overwhelmingly helpful linux users in the lounge and leader lounge are to each other.

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#9

I love almost everything about Linux.

Windows, I don’t really have any appreciation for. I only use it because I must (for sim racing and Solidworks) and nothing else.

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#10

I love how linux makes you think with your own brain.

Tech is part of our lives, how our tools work should be general knowledge at least to a degree - tech illitiration might backfire hard.

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#11

Shirley you can appreciate how hard those devs are working at building C++ and making sure it runs smoothly on Winderz? :wink:

Already has in some places. I worked at a company where it was 100% common for people to call Hell Desk to right click on something or search Outlook for an e-mail they couldn’t find.

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#12

I like to think that this is an on purpose typo.

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#13

Yeah it’s kinda sad, but I’m assuming those were people from earlier generations?
I won’t blame oldies at least, but some youth today who game 24/7 or program for that matter might have no clue how a computer works.

I always relate PC’s to cars: if you use one it’s your own benefit knowing at least to some level how the engine works.

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#14

I definitely appreciate the work the devs have made with the game and those who’ve worked on the graphics drivers, but I really don’t have much appreciation for Windows as an OS.

On a side note: The game my league races in actually runs fine in Linux. The issue is there are no Linux drivers (that I know of) for the wheel & pedals I use (Thrustmaster TMX + G27 pedals & G27 shifter). I would love to create the drivers I need and post them up for all to use, but I simply don’t have the time to learn how to code & compile it.

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#15

That was my official title: Hell Desk Escalation

You’d be flabbergasted. Late twenties to early fifties. All in between. One guy even said “Yeah, I majored in MIS, just can’t remember how to do this. Nervous Laughter

Bitch you right click select Find in Page

This saddens me. A lot of programmers only care about hardware when it comes to video games.

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#16

To battle the issue, calling all nerds who have or will have kids - teach them about the world we live in today lol.

‘Hello Ruby’ is neat, I’d be intersted if there’s other stuff out there apart from RPi’s, but that’s another topic.

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#17

Probably verging into off-topic space

But! I agree and disagree. I think it’s good to teach kids computer science early on, especially as programming continues to separate into “easy” and “advanced” (no disrespect to anyone, earning a living and doing what you love is more important than elitism). But I want my kids to also play in the mud, read books (on paper), chase each other down the street, go trick or treating, etc. Not that you can’t have both, but I’ve know two parents that read tech books to kids while they go to sleep or send them to computer camp at ages 4 and 5… Too aggro imo.

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#18

Totally agree, ‘Hello Ruby’ won’t teach kids how to code tho, it’s about a girl called Ruby.
A typical kids book anyway.

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#19

image

Sounds like my kind of book. Oh, wait, it’s a kids book. Fuck sorry.

Yet another reason Ruby is superior to Python (get gek’t redgek)

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#20

Fuck ruby! :joy:

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