Return to

Level1 News October 10 2017: The Riskiest of Clicks | Level One Techs


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at




Equifax has 1 person responsible for patching?

You guys missed the part on the pixel that their adapter price is more than double Apple, they are just stealing every move from their play book


For the pixel adapter thing, iphones do come with the adapter in the box, but they break easily as always


They both come with one in the box just the google one is more expensive


Obligatory shit-post before getting to the end of the episode :slight_smile:

The browser auto-fill thing is, as I understand it, a standard for payment forms. Currently, there are an unlimited number of ways payment forms can be built. It is hard for browsers and extensions to auto-fill them because every site would be different. The solution is to define a standard, and let the browser supply the specific information the site asks for. Would I personally trust my browser with my payment details? Undecided on this. Leaning towards no.


hurts me seeing your ux with firefox.

please tweak it. there are plenty performance settings to try, like using more than 7 multi-processes, ublock orign rulesets block alot overhead scripts, seperately from ads


+1 @wendell why are you not using any adblock. Even though it’s the recommended practise.

About the google pixel notebook. Regardless of the operating system, laptops like Macbook Air, Surface laptop, Pixel are utterly useless. They have next to no I/O ports and are super expensive. Tthey are nothing but waste of rare earth metals.


Regarding Researchgate:

The most disturbing thing about that situation is that publishers are commandeering literature that is generally the product of public funding. This however makes billions that augments financial growth in the US economy; so it’s allowed. This is literally theft; in every sense, meaning and intention of the word. This is what happens when we focus on the growth imperative and means of production. Capitalism has all but undone what the new implementation of Democracy has done for education. In order for a populous to vote it’s conscience, an understanding of the issues is required. Not that that’s even applicable since the late 1800s.


Regarding Kim .com and much of what’s happening on the internet: (trigger warning)

There is one place on the planet that doesn’t have dedicated policing… it’s the internet. The internet is essentially an Anarchy that is breaking systems all over the world. It’s not because people are assholes or anything like that. It’s because we don’t have a clue as to how to address behavior regulation in virtual spaces. It may be that we are just overthinking the problem to begin with. It’s also inconsistencies in the laws of nations states and inability to apply international law. It’s definitely, partially because there is no dedicated police force patrolling public, virtual spaces. Stephen Pinker makes the argument of how an uninterested, third party can often prevent contention between individuals and institutions. This is something that is lacking in the centralized, public model of the internet.

If the internet were more decentralized, it would be much easier for uninterested, third parties to defer responsibility to the host. This is not happening… at all… across the board. These actions against Kim .com and almost everyone else are a direct result of a model that isn’t allowing enforcement of the law.

I’m not trying to blame anyone. This is a result of general human ignorance concerning an emergent technology. I doubt that the eventual solution will seem favorable to most. This cannot last. It’s an economy killer.

Regarding ISP regional monopolies in the US:

Monopolies are illegal in the US. Regional monopolies are a method of skirting the law. The major ISPs have an unwritten contract to not piss on each others gates to prevent the eventuality of one king of the hill that is contrary to American law. Legally there cannot be one winner; therefor there must be a “duopoly” that works in conjunction, to prevent all from being lost.

The notion that there could be regional duopolies is ridiculous; because it goes against the market model itself. Monopolies exist in the US like runaway trains. They cannot be stopped without immediate contingencies; because of the financial influence that is leveraged against the economy.

It’s one of those “letter of the law vs spirit of the law” scenarios; because consumers all over the US are feeling the same effects as if there were national monopolies; only maybe a little less severe.

It’s not likely that this problem will be solved until the attended risk factor is no longer relevant. This probably goes until it falls under it’s own weight. The say that the best way to predict the future is to study the past.


Regarding the child abuse site and federal law:

It’s easy to reason out that more cases of abuse could be stopped by standing by until the required evidence is produced. It’s much harder to reason out how one or more children have to be thrown under the train until this happens. If it were the case that very specialized laws were written to prevent such “paradoxes” in enforcement, then maybe this wouldn’t be the case. Rather, laws are too often vague so that they can be used (abused) for many other purposes. For instance, The “liberty Act”. There has been a great deal of maturity in local governance in my lifetime. This movement toward federal involvement is similar to a small glass of kool aid or maybe a hit off a crack pipe. It’s likely to do nothing but pass down the corruption to those more in touch with the public. It’s similar to the corporate teet strategy. It’s typical of socializing states.

Regarding Puerto Rico:

There is a huge advantage to being on the back side of disaster. There is nothing but growth to look forward to. If they play it smart, don’t take offerings and take this on the chin, then they will be much better off in the long run than they were before the hurricane. This is common knowledge between investors like those of the Wall St. Casino. I’m almost positive that they are looking to loot future Puerto Rico. These people buy futures for a living. Capitalist countries are more likely to send investors with brief cases to your country than soldiers with assault rifles; but they are there for the same purpose. The first sign of mismanagement results in austerity. The investors take over as if it were their country to begin with. This even happens in states and cities in the US. Look at Chicago, for instance.


About Kim Dotcom…

You know, I don’t know why people are defending him as if he were a white knight that never did anything wrong and blablabla…
Like really, the guy knew exactly what he was doing hosting that thing, and he knew exactly how to monetise off of stuff he didn’t own.
And the argument “oh he didn’t upload anything himself” doesn’t really help that. This was clearly intentional for illegal activity. Sure there might have been two or three legal files on there but he knew damn well that the overwhelming majority of files on there was illegal, and he didn’t really try and fight that either, he just embraced it because :dollar: :dollar: :dollar:.

And yeah how his house was raided were probably some weird circumstances but really he had it coming for a long time. Could it have been done cleaner? Sure, but that doesn’t change the outcome.
It’s the same that happened to Rapidshare and netload and all those other hosters. There’s a reason they are registered in countries where they are relatively safe from US authorities, they’re not stupid, but that doesn’t make it less illegal.

Maybe someone can enlighten me why people are defending him… Maybe I missed something.


The Register is great. Informative and amusing.


why do pages like piratebay get official ddos protection anyway? isnt there an embargo or something for illegal pages?


Because cloudflare isn’t just purely DDoS protection, it’s a CDN, the DDoS protection is more or less a side effect that they are advertising.
And depending on the plan TPB is running (I assume not just the free plan) it’s also cash. So unless there were a company policy or a request by some agency that’s not going away.


The case revolves around copyright infringement, which is a civil matter between Dotcom and the movie/music companies. It takes some serious mental gymnastics to classify it as criminal fraud, which the DOJ had to do in order to be able to seize his assets and request his extradition.

Even though MegaUpload mostly consisted of pirated material indeed, its terms of service clearly stated that users were not allowed to upload copyrighted materials.
Whenever a DMCA request was filed, links to the offending files were promptly removed.
Some record labels and movie studios had direct access which allowed them to delete links to their intellectual property. That way they didn’t even have to contact the MegaUpload staff and wait for them to respond.
And then there’s the small issue of privacy laws which didn’t even allow MegaUpload staff to manually check the users’ uploaded files as long as there was no complaint from a copyright holder.

His assets were seized by the US DOJ even though he has never committed any crimes on US soil. He has never even been to the US.
At best you could say that US companies suffered losses due to MegaUpload, but that is still open for discussion now that the recently uncovered EU report shows that piracy doesn’t negatively affect sales.

The seizure also makes it nearly impossible for him to pay for his defense. He can’t sell anything he owns, has no access to his bank accounts etc without permission from a judge. He ran out of money on a number of occasions because he simply wasn’t allowed to withdraw money to pay his legal bills (which so far are over $20 million IIRC).

Oh, and then there’s also the matter of the illegal spying prior to the raid on his home in 2012, the warrants which were so broad that they were declared illegal until an appeals court overturned that 2 years later, the illegal cloning of his hard drives by the FBI, etc.
So yeah, it’s fairly obvious that the feds just want to hang him at all costs.

I don’t like the guy. He has way too much of an ego. Still, I can only root for him because IMO the other parties in this whole case are the real crooks.


I never understood the Surface Laptop as somebody who likes the Surface Pro, there aren’t many tablets to choose from that are as good as the Surface Pro but there are many good options for laptops for an expensive laptop with no I/O to even make it on my list like the Surface Laptop, Google Pixel, or god forbid, that joke of a Macbook.


I would hazard a guess to say it would be hypocritical to produce content which benefits from advertising while openly blocking adverts.
@Tim_FreeD might be onto something, if you can beforehand block most of the bloated scripts while allowing some adverts to show. Sounds like a job for an intern, or a level 1 technician.


I just made a topic about it


The problem is that most of the slowdowns come from ads though, because they chat with their respective servers like 200% of the time and it just eats all the CPU cycles, it’s a nightmare.

Tracking scripts aren’t really a big deal performance wise since they “only” track you when you actually do stuff (loading the page, clicking, leaving the page). But ad scripts are just on a loop.

I’ve tried using XIVDB with Privacy Tracker disabled for a while and it was a nightmare. Look at the DevTools console…


In May credit reporting service Equifax’s website was breached by attackers who eventually made off with Social Security numbers, names, and a dizzying amount of other details for some 145.5 million US consumers. For several hours on Wednesday, and again early Thursday morning, the site was maliciously manipulated again, this time to deliver fraudulent Adobe Flash updates, which when clicked, infected visitors’ computers with adware that was detected by only three of 65 antivirus providers.


We is screwed! #DayOffDrunkPost