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Huawei Unveils Harmony OS - Thoughts?

android
#1

Harmony OS

Saw this on a group on friends. You guys already have thoughts on the matter?

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#2

Not a huge fan of the Internet of Shit part, but it’ll be neat having more competition in the mobile OS space.

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#3

Android China market share will be going down then. /s maybe /s. Hauwei are still prioritizing Android. But if poo poo hits the fan…

Youtubers already got videos up of the announcements.

TLDW:

  • Was created 10 years ago

  • Seamless across all devices

  • Open sauce

  • Shared Developer Ecosystem ( build app once and flexibly deploy an app across different devices )

  • microkernel based for better latency and security

  • OS can be run on many different smart devices ex: smart watches, smart screens, smart speakers, in vehicle systems, smart phones, routers, etc.

  • Deterministic Latency Engine reduces response latency of applications by 25.7%

  • Version 1.0 to be released later this year only in China and worldwide at a later date

  • CoMpEtItIoN iS gReAt


According to a guy from this thread, https://www.reddit.com/r/Android/comments/cnzccb/huawei_officially_reveals_harmony_os_its_first/ they will show off the OS on Honor TV tomorrow.

From Forbes: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.forbes.com/sites/bensin/2019/08/09/huaweis-consumer-boss-on-harmony-os-and-whether-it-can-run-google-apps-mate-30-and-mate-x/amp/

The CEO gave a clouded answer on whether their new OS can run android apps:

“It would be in Google’s interest to let Harmony OS run Google apps.”

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#4

So it can but they are not allowed do it officially yet.

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#5

Emulation layers aren’t illegal… I think. So they could always go that route.

Or maybe not. IDK. Lol. If google say that huawei can’t use android apps, even with an emulation later they’d still be in trouble.

I was trying to compare it to windows programs being run on Linux. Lol

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#6

It’s a bit complicated, I guess. While I think there aren’t laws against it (as long as you’re not pirating it), googl might still find a way to mess with them.

The fact that it is open source makes me a bit more interested to see where it goes. Does it mean the user could modify it and flash their own device?

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#7

Curious what we’ll have to rip out of it to make it secure, but if it’s running a microkernel, I might have to check it.

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#8

As far as I know Google can only say if a manufacturer is certified to run thier suite of proprietary apps. Android is open source and that’s why there are so many devices using it without Google’s services.
For example BB OS supported (somewhat) Android apps and I’ve never heard about them having any kind of contract with Google for that emulation layer.

Regarding the OS everything’s fancy on paper, but everything comes down to the users. And I don’t think users want to give up Android for some obscure OS they’re not used to, with less apps compatibility and so on. I think the market for mobile OS is already taken. Unless Google or Apple fuck up so badly that they give up.

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#9

The first commercial product to feature the OS is an Honor made smart TV.

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#10

Yeah that would be my concern. Or rather the bait and switch. They get the OS established and then some day down the road they start to sprinkle in questionable code, or even some binary blobs. I mean people are saying open source but are we talking GPL or something they cooked up themselves? Lots of questions.

Well, it’s more about the apps to be honest. Most users don’t care what’s running under the hood per say so long as it’s UI is familiar and they can use their apps/content. Especially if Huawei massively discounts flagship devices to break into the market, something they’re probably in a position to do.

But before that it’s the question if they can even deliver on these features? I mean it’s one thing to claim it and another to deliver it.

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#11

Even if it is GPL, it’s China. China steels everyone’s IP and the government doesn’t care about copyright and licenses and stuff.

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#12

lol, well true. I could see them take away access to the code, have their people that infiltrated any forks destroy all copies, and then re-release it closed source once it had established itself and app developers were drinking the cool aid. :stuck_out_tongue:

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#13

They have no say in that regard. They don’t own people’s apps. They do own the google cloud frameworks that people use though. I assume this is what they are referring to when they say google apps not android apps.

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#14

They’re linked aspects for sure. What I was referring to is the OS UI, even if it’s on top of Android. I’ve seen many users buying over and over Huawei or Samsung phones because they had already one or two and they’re familiar with all the settings and extra functionality those skins offer over stock Android.
Regarding the apps if Huawei implements some kind of compatibility that actually works I think they could get away with making an OS of their own (in a pretty cheap way since they don’t have to work with devs to have apps work on their phone).

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#15

I’m just hoping it’ll be a success , if only to undermine the stranglehold of American tech companies like Google etc. The thought that they can just fu’k with the world’s internet and tech markets on the whim of the American State has to be resisted.

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#16

That’s a good point actually, I don’t necessarily trust China, but when you consider that many people don’t care about security, only convenience, it will definitely have the potential to upset the market norms.

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#17

I don’t understand 100% the implications of china’s spying habit on other countries outside of North America.

Like, what would they do spying on me here in Brazil, a 3rd world country? Most they could do is watching me take a dump.

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#18

Assuming they were spying the data could be used for lots of things from affecting your decision making by manipulating what you see online to using your data to help more accurately determine how to manipulate your country to the benefit of China.

(‘3rd world’ countries can make people a lot of money)

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#19

That’s fairly reasonable.

But I don’t think I’d give it a shot tho

They would manipulate me into importing sh!t from aliexpress and wish D:

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#20

That and if they’re monitoring microphones and stuff, it’s definitely great for IP theft.

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