Going insane with filesharing on Windows 10 1803

Need some help, i been battling with my main PC, running windows 10 Home that recently updated to 1803. On 1709 and before, sharing was as simple as its been for years with windows, i own many PC on a local network, and all have same user and pw, and sharing was as simple as turning on network discovery, i can see all my pcs and access their main hard drives, even shared individual extra hardrives from some pcs, all work perfect.

Now windows 10 decided to drop Workgroups on 1803 and probably some other stuff that broke my network sharing. I still have a 4x Windows 7 pcs, a blue iris dedicated camera server, a small pc that its use for when someone else needs a pc, my brothers laptop, a windows 2011 (thats similar to 7) and now dual booting my pc between 7 and 10.

All windows 7 PCs work great, but none of my windows 10 pcs (2 with home, 2 with pro) can access the windows 7 machines, they see the PC on the network but once you click on them, they negotiate but never resolve, Error 0x80070035 appears.

I have look for tutorials, on youtube and forums, i feel there are lots of info as this is something that many use, but i have tried everything that i have found and still the same issue. Here some videos and things that i have tried,

How To Homegroup Without Homegroup in Windows 10 - April 2018 Update

  • Setting / Network and Internet / Status / Change connection properties / Network Profile / Private
  • Setting / Network and Internet / Status / Sharing options / Private / Turn on network discovery, Turn on File and printer Sharing
  • Setting / Network and Internet / Status / Sharing options / All networks / Turn off public folder sharing, use 128bit encryption, Turn off password protected sharing
  • Windows Explorer / Folder / Give Access to / Everyone

How To Share a Complete Drive in Windows 10 - April 2018 Update
I also tried to share the folder and hardrive as explained on the video.
Also did the Services / Function Discovery Resource publication / Automatic and checked that it was started and running.

Error 0x80070035 “No se Encuentra la Ruta de Acceso a la Red” en Windows 10/8/7「4 Soluciones」2018

  • TCP/IP Netbios Helper: check that it was automatic and running
  • Network and Sharing center / Ethernet / Properties / TCP/IPv4 / Properties / Advanced / WINS / Enable NetBios over TCP/IP
  • REGEDIT / Hkey_Local_machine / Software / Microsoft / MSLicensing / Removing HARDWAREID and STORE
  • Local Security Policy / I couldn’t do it because its removed on my freshly formatted w10 1803, probably the video is 1709 that was upgraded (i really don’t know).

I still cant access any of the windows 7 computers drives or folders from a windows 10 1803 machine, i have even formated in case i messed it up, and did all the settings again, no luck, i was so frustrated that i installed windows 7 again on my main pc and it works fine accessing windows 7 and 10 machines.

Either way, i really want to go back to 10, i have issues with Z370/8700K on 7 (not huge but does have some issues), so if you have any recommendations ill give a shot.

Thanks,

Why are you accessing a dozen separate computers individually instead of having a central file share?

edit: also home server 2011 is no longer supported, i recommend you replace it.

1 Like

Thanks for the reply Eden,

Why are you accessing a dozen separate computers individually instead of having a central file share?

There are lots of uses for me, here some

  1. I have a separate Blue Iris server (surveillance) that i check videos among settings (also cant connect with remote desktop).
  2. I also have HTPC that access mostly the WHS for files but sometimes access others pcs.
  3. I also have a test bench where i test fans, hardware, even different OS and setups, a lot of results are i move to the WHS2011 or to my main pc for further use.
  4. I move files from either computers to my tablets and mobile devices, sometimes the files have been recently downloaded or are stored on WHS2011 so i need to access them from my main pc to transfer them.
  5. I record on a dedicated capture/streaming pc that i move the files to my main pc to do edit/rendering for videos, so accessing those folder is needed.
  6. I do backups of family and friend computers, they are going to come with 7 and 8 and 10, i need to be able to access those computers and move the files to the server.
  7. I also have laptop that i do transfer files from when im on the road, not keen on cloudservices.

edit: also home server 2011 is no longer supported, i recommend you replace it.

Even though the server itself is not the issue, im interested into what do you recommend to move to?

1 Like

The reason I asked is just that it seems like your current way of doing things is just tiresome. You could set up central storage (you have a box acting as a server already) and have all your systems connect to that. It’s just a thought as it seems like it would make things far easier. You can for example set up network shares, or set up SANs that essentially look like local drives to the computer.

If your familial with Windows you might be happy just sticking with that, obviously there’s a cost though and it might be over priced for the functions you want, really depends on you. Other options are to use something else like FreeNAS or similar depending on your needs. It’s something you should definitely put on your plans to upgrade at some point. (You have until Jan 2020 for Windows 7)

As for your current problem. I’m not overly familiar with all the ins and outs of Windows file sharing @anon79053375 might know better. But Windows 10 1803 disabled SMBv1 this may or may not be causing issues (if it is, work around it, do not enable SMBv1).

I’ve no test machines. You should still be able to set up specific shares.

e.g. (on Windows 10 at least)
If you right click the folder you want to share -> Give access to -> Specific People - > Click the drop down, add the specific people or give ‘everyone’ access - > Share

Access via \\computername or ip\path\to\shared\folder

So for example a folder in your users documents folder \\ip\user\Documents\share

Actually SMBv1 is the only one that allows browsing via \\computername, if you’re using v2/3 you need to go to \\computername\share.

Also it’s perfectly fine to run SMBv1 on your LAN, just like it’s fine to run your home server frontends without HTTPS. Obviously you would never do that on a business intranet.

2 Likes

Absolutist statements like this are bad advice, not to mention wrong. It’s not perfectly fine to run SMBv1 on your LAN or anywhere, there’s so many reasons its just silly. Unless you have an extremely specific requirement for it (which is rare), just keep it off, there are far better alternatives like… SMB2/3.

1 Like

Completely disagree. Everybody needs to make their own determination on appropriate security for their private LAN. If you want to lock it down for whatever reason sure, go crazy, you are the king of your castle. There’s just no particular justification to do so.

I would still argue against this.

There is absolutely no reason to be using HTTP for anything other than legacy DNS queries.

Just because it’s private doesn’t mean its absolved.

Security is like a gunshot to the head. Probably won’t happen, but when it does it will be devastating if you’re not prepared.

Regardless, OP could solve his problem with filezilla and SFTP. Or centralize with a server.

Sure there is. It’s easier, and you don’t need to worry about allowing self-signed certs every time you login to your pi-hole or whatever.

If someone gets into your home LAN you have bigger problems than sniffing unencrypted web trafic and SMB DoS attacks. But you need to make that determination yourself.

You can’t mount a remote SFTP service without a bunch of shenanigans and it doesn’t support random access so it is not a reasonable solution.

There are very few legitimate reasons to use SMB1, those reasons pretty much come down to you’re running legacy enterprise hardware that require it and you can’t yet switch it out. In all other cases there is almost zero reason for it. Its old, depreciated, slow, insecure, inefficient, the list goes on. All supported OS’ support SMB2+. There’s no longer any reason for it for day to day systems, locking down a system isnt the only reason not to use SMB1.

1 Like

I personally use SMBv1 because Kodi on Android doesn’t work with SMBv2/3 yet. The next release will, and then I’ll turn it off.

In the case of the OP, the lowest common denominator on his Win7/Home Server 2011/Win10 environment should be SMBv2. So he would ideally use that.

You’re forgetting g that the samba implementation fromm the Samba project it self is up to 3.x which is from a security and administration stadpoint a much better alternative to any other version of the software package.

@Eden, Ruffalo, Dynamic_Gravity and flipper_RHEL, thanks for taking the time into replying to my thread.

The reason I asked is just that it seems like your current way of doing things is just tiresome. You could set up central storage (you have a box acting as a server already) and have all your systems connect to that. It’s just a thought as it seems like it would make things far easier. You can for example set up network shares, or set up SANs that essentially look like local drives to the computer.

I understand your POV, and while i agree to some point, the WHS2011 is not on most of the time, its mostly used a storage server that its only turn on when im home and even when im home its only turn on when others pcs need to offload to it or load files from it. It might seen not optional to you, but im not home most of the month and no one else uses it. I do run some pcs 24/7 like the camera server but in this case it needs to be on to record my home surveillance, also downloads from an external FTP with filezilla, but i prefer not to keep a 22 disk storage sever (WHS2011) doing this duty out of electrical cost.

If your familial with Windows you might be happy just sticking with that, obviously there’s a cost though and it might be over priced for the functions you want, really depends on you. Other options are to use something else like FreeNAS or similar depending on your needs. It’s something you should definitely put on your plans to upgrade at some point.

I’m more familiar to Windows, but im open to others suggestions, specially since my WHS2011 is broken atm, was planning to re do it again, but you have once again open my interest on other options. I never really liked FREENAS/ZFS with the needs of specific sets of disk to create a RaidZ, i like more to able to remove or add drives as the storage server fills up, for this reason i went with WHSv1 for 4 years and now 5 years with WHS2011 + Stablebitt drivepool. Before the 1803 issues i was also doing a new build to start testing unRiad, as it will retain the ability to add / remove drives, dislike a lot the transfer write limitations but can be fixed with a cache drive, but unsure atm weather it will work out with the changes on 1803. I also have considered moving into Synology with its hybrid raid, i own a DS111j that i played around over the years and seems very easy and functional, i never really consider going with it fully out of the pricing of their 12 drives server / expansions, but i might reconsider upon WHS2011 being fased out.

As for your current problem. I’m not overly familiar with all the ins and outs of Windows file sharing @anon79053375 might know better. But Windows 10 1803 disabled SMBv1 this may or may not be causing issues (if it is, work around it, do not enable SMBv1).

I never really research much about SMB/NFS, simply out of how simple was to share drives under windows with simply using same user/pw on all pcs, but you are probably right, maybe W7 is using SMB1 and W10 1803 is not. Ill reserach some more about this.

If you right click the folder you want to share -> Give access to -> Specific People - > Click the drop down, add the specific people or give ‘everyone’ access - > Share

Access via \computername or ip\path\to\shared\folder

I did this before leaving home and didn’t work out, but i feel its more because of what you said before about SMB1, ill see if i can force the SMB2 on the W7 maybe it will negotiatie this way with the W10 pcs.

Actually SMBv1 is the only one that allows browsing via \computername, if you’re using v2/3 you need to go to \computername\share.

Let me ask you, is the syntaxis of how you presented forces on W7/W10 to use SMBv1 or v2? for example typing \computername\share on the w10 pc on windows explorer will make it usre sbmv2 and the w7 pc will also use smb v2 because of how the w10 is requesting?

Regardless, OP could solve his problem with filezilla and SFTP. Or centralize with a server.

I’ll start researching the SFTP, currently i do use filezilla with FTP on a external server, but never really thought about it for a local network sharing and transferring, specially since not all the time is about transferring but playing or streaming.

In the case of the OP, the lowest common denominator on his Win7/Home Server 2011/Win10 environment should be SMBv2. So he would ideally use that.

I like your comments about going SMBv2 because of the computers i own mostly are w7/10, now im not that familiar with smb, i just know its a protocol for network sharing, do i need to do something like disable smbv1 on windows 7 machines to force the smbv2 to run? i have check online and found the following link from microsoft, would you suggest to use this? How to detect, enable and disable SMBv1, SMBv2, and SMBv3 in Windows and Windows Server

The S is for SSL. If you FTP without it, then all that data is being sent int he clear and can be seen en route.

Any linux server running SSHD will you this functionality out of the box, the only thing you will have to do is generate secure keys and import them into your servers .ssh directory, once you do that, you will reasonable security and won’t have to worry about passwords anymore as it uses the key to authenticate.

How does one prepare for a gunshot to the head? :thinking:

If I may expand on that analogy, I’d argue that two of the most important questions one have to ask oneself is:

  1. How likely is it that someone will attempt to shoot me in the head?
    Am I an attractive and exposed target in a warzone, or an unknown entity in a Norwegian bunker?
  2. How cumbersome will an effective helmet be to carry around?
    I.E., How inconvenient is it to use, and does it inhibit access or usage of/to utilities or locations?

By wearing a helmet, and not putting oneself in harms way. Getting self defence training, and learning how to treat wounds.

Average people probably won’t have a hit on them, but if they are ever unlucky enough to be in that situation and are not prepared for it, then their gamble has failed.

Just because people don’t see themselves as a target, does not abstain them from being one. And if they are not prepared to handle a hack, then it is only a matter of when the event will occur and they will lose.

If they don’t know how to be secure it is a matter of ignorance.

If they know how to be secure but don’t, then it is gross negligence.

Hmmm, this stablebit drivepool thing is interesting, like lvm/btrfs/zfs but for Windows. Allows changing redundancy levels per folder if I read correctly – nice, I’d love that kind of flexibility in a Linux box.