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NVME Wars: Adata XPG SX8200 vs Samsung 970 Pro/EVO Plus | Level One Techs

#21

Have you seen it’s price? 80 euro for half terabyte… SATA drives are 60 euros…
Fuck me, since when is Intel actually good price/performance?

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#22

Issue is pcie lanes tho, most people have enough lanes for 2 (chipset and off cpu)maybe 3(chipset, cpu and 8x stolen from gpu) so you cant really get small drives and have a bunch

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#23

I think reliablility is key. How reliable is quad layer channels? QLC also has s significantly lessened life span.

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#24

5 year warranty who cares? (Warrently is basically 100TB per 500gig)

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#25

Well I don’t really see a reason to have everything on my boot drive. I kinda need a small fast boot drive and the rest is running just fine on my hard drive right now…
I honestly see no reason for a standard user to run huge nvme drive…

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#26

I like around 500 gig for OS and 1tb for games

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#27

I have a 250gb nvme and 1tb sata and loads of spinning rust.

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#28

image

The optane still kills the q1t1 performance

image

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#29

Dafak are you doing to your OS? I run W10 on 64 gig data drive…

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#30

I need a 900p. Even tho I don’t need a 900p.

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#31

I use that rule so if i only have 1 drive (like i have right now, altho do have 1tb 960 evo sitting that might make it into this rig maybe not) that its not an issue for games

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#32

900p
image
Soon ™

$300 per drive is roughly the max ill ever pay (280 was $250, couldnt justify the 480 for $450 hoping Znand will happen soon damn you samsung)

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#33

A-data does show some impressive numbers there for the money.
But the question is, are they just as reliable as say samsung?
That is yet to be seen i guess.

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#34

Yup, I was asking myself the same thing. I’d be curious how much data you can write to the Adata before the NAND wears out.
Techreport did a torture test on a bunch of SATA SSDs back in the day. Perhaps someone should repeat that test with NVMe drives.

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#35

Exactly what I was thinking too.

If you have a ZFS array on every machine, and everything is check-summed everywhere, who cares if the drive dies earlier? For example, I remember someone mentioning that Backblaze uses Seagate drives despite knowing that they have shorter lifespans, because the cheaper price makes up for the worse reliability. When you have a bunch of infrastructure in place that keeps your data safe regardless, reliability is less of a concern; but there are many users who don’t have that in place.

I wish at least some reviews would talk about lifespan, or at least how the drive will fail:

  • How much warning does it give you to replace it?
  • Are the SMART status readings reliable?
  • Will the average user be able to relocate their data in time?

That endurance experiment was especially disturbing when you read about the failure state, where the drives will brick themselves. Why can’t they be designed to switch to permanent read only mode instead?

1 Like