Memory Overclocking Question

Hey Guys,

 

I have a Gigabyte F2A75M-HD2, this board supports up to 2133 mhz 1.5 volts. Now I have a Crucial Ballistix Tactical Tracer 1866mhz CL9 at 1.5 volts.  I want to overclock it to 2133, though based on my research this will require me to push the voltage probably up to 1.6 volts and the latency to 10ms. Any suggestion on this?

Here are my concerns:

 

1. My motheboard and RAM supports 1.5v what'll happen if I make it 1.6, will it fry my board or my RAM?

2. What will happen if the overclocking fail, will it damage the ram or motherboard?

 

Here are my parts for details:

Motherboard: http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=4759&dl=1#sp

Ram: http://www.crucial.com/store/partspecs.aspx?IMODULE=BLT2KIT4G3D1869DT2TXRG

PSU: http://www.seasonicusa.com/S12II-Bronze.htm

 

Thanks,

It comes down to the silicon lottery mate, you may not have to crank the voltage at all for 2133 if the kit is golden. Timings however will most likely have to be loosened up. Just go up in small increments and be sure to stress test thoroughly. 

Running at 1.6v + you run the small risk of frying the cpu (memory controller) and the ram itself. Majority of the time its only upwards of 1.65v should you start to worry. Just have to weigh up the risk vs benefit.

  • Latency is not in miliseconds, it is in number of clock cycles.
  • If you need to increase your CAS latency to 10 to achieve a 2133 MHz frequency, then you're probably not going to get any performance increase.
  • The best method of overclocking would be to decrease your CAS latency to 8 rather than 9, and keep the frequency at 1866 MHz or downclock the frequency for stability.

A increase from CAS 9 to CAS 10 to go from 1866mhz to 2133mhz is not a big deal, remember CAS is a number of cycles, not a unit of time. Thus its actully a speed up of 2.88% until a memory unit may be read after writing. Not to mention the 14.31% increase in bandwidth due to the faster speed. However i am dubious you could achieve a 2133mhz straight Cas10 overclock on stock voltage. But not harm in trying, worst case it doesn't post and you try again.

Personally I run Cas8 1600mhz 1.5v memory in my desktop, but this is because I don't do large sequential reads or writes. Instead the lower latency makes the computer more responsive (read feel faster) in light tasks like opening a web page. If I where using the computer for editing large files like images or movies, the ram speed (and quantity) would be a much more important factor, as these are huge sequential tasks, so the few extra milliseconds between reading and writing to the RAM would easily be regained in the faster access to the data stored within it.

Regarding voltage, LGA2011, FM2, FM2+ and AM3 socket processors typically have no issue with up to 1.65v, in fact memory at this voltage factory XMP is reasonably common for these platforms.

On the other hand caution should be used with socket LGA1155 at this voltage, some CPU's don't like it and others don't mind. Regarding LGA1150 I'd avoid going over 1.5v unless you really know what your doing, haswell CPU's recommend this as the max. Having said that I do know people running 1.65v memory with no issues on overclocked, water cooled i7 4770k processors, but do so at your own risk, differences in clock speed, running temperatures and luck may cause you problems they avoided, so you have been warned.

A increase from CAS 9 to CAS 10 to go from 1866mhz to 2133mhz is not a big deal, remember CAS is a number of cycles, not a unit of time. Thus its actully a speed up of 2.88% until a memory unit may be read after writing. Not to mention the 14.31% increase in bandwidth due to the faster speed.

Increasing frequency is not directly proportional to bandwidth or read/write times. There are a plethora of latencies and timings besides CAS latency which are affected by the clock frequency. While in theory an increase from 1866 MHz to 2133 MHz with CL 9 to CL 10 should be better, in practice you often won't observe any difference in performance at all. Some benchmarks indicate that 2133 MHz CL 10 has worst performance than 1866 MHz CL 9.

Hey guys thank you for all the input, just to prove some things in the discussion. I'm using an A8-6600k

Here are some real world results:

1. For A5H, tightening my latency to 8 while staying to 1866 didn't change anything except for rendering a video, that's the only difference, in gaming nothing. So in my case downclocking my frequency for the latency is pointless.

2. For SheepInACart, the jump to 2133 with latency of 10 is a big deal, I was now able to play GhostRecon Future Soldier in Max @ 1366x768, and it only now dips at 25fps minimum, before the jump to 2133 with cl9, I only play it in 720p with medium settings.

3. For deejeta, you were right, I was able to push my ram to 2133 with same voltage and same latency.

 

Actually I was able to push the ram to 2400, and run a stress test with no problem, my only problem is when I go back to windows only 4 gigs if my stick got recognized, even though the bios can see all my ram. So I got back to my 2133 setup.