If you had the possibility to revert from Win 11, would you?

Soon cometh the day, when I will finally reinstall my home PC’s Win 10, which has survived for 4+ years (Windows folder was created on 9th of Dec, 2019…hehe). I finally got my answer for “Hm, should I use stuff like Windows Manager tools to remove garbage from the registry and stuff”(it was obvious, yes, but it took me a while).

And now I’m questioning my further life choices.

In one hand - Win 10, which has worked like a charm for the day it was released (even remember using beta). I do realize the “Updates” and LTS coming to an end, but I blocked those a while ago (I have zero trust in the security updates, so yes, not looking forward to have the system up-to-date).

In the other - Win 11. Despite the error reports I come across once in a while, I am considering win 11 just because I will be soon upgrading to 13th gen Intel and it seems reasonable to have that core management.

So the question basically is - for people, who upgraded to Win 11 from Win 10, would you go back for your daily home use?

For me the fact that I resorted to “clean up tools” was simply because I really don’t want to go through the hassle of configuring (and actually remembering those small QoL tweaks I made over the years). And this is why I would wish to avoid going Win 11, getting frustrated to the point where I would go in “F it!” mode, and do the Win 10 install.

Install OpenShell to replace the Start Menu, install ExplorerPatcher to fix the taskbar, and forget you’re on Windows 11.

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Yeah, I already have a few items on my check list to do if going Win 11.
But if only it ended there.

Came across a yt video not long ago, where a person was showing a few “improvements” Win 11 did like absence of drag-n-drop features Win 10 ui (I think it was related to task bar) had.

But currently don’t have the courage to start actually looking through articles/videos about what QoL features are missing. And stuff that they actually brick… like driver support, or even functionality which I use like start C:\Windows\System32\DisplaySwitch.exe /external cmd to switch between TV and Monitor.

This is exactly what I did.

I also used Rufus to create a bootable USB install drive. Rufus let’s you turn off a lot of Win11 crap before making the USB drive to make install quick and easy.

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I hate stock WIn 11. I wouldn’t be on it but I just re did my computer and games are starting to come out that will use DirectStorage.

But Atlas OS makes it easily bearable. I don’t even notice the difference from Win 10 anymore for the most part. Install with Rufus to disable online account requirements first and to make a local user before install, then install the OS, do all the updates, then install AtlasOS. Very easy

Thanks for the Atlas OS. Reading what it is about.

Can you share some detail on what specifically did Win 11 negative in comparison to Win 10?

  • Middle task bar is awful and should only be there when used as a tablet OS. I hate not being able to flick my mouse to a corner and have it be on the start button. Now I have to actually look at what I am doing and find the button.
  • The start menu itself is a bit better than WI 10 at least though, as I hated the big flat square icons for pinned items that WIn10 had. But I still hate the giant “recommendations” area.
  • cut, copy, paste being icons now instead of words is a horrible design choice. Unless you know specifically what the icon is supposed to be then you cant find what you are looking for.
  • The slightly different layout of right click menu makes you have to relearn muscle memory.
  • The new “home” area instead of “this PC” has more fluff that I don’t care about at all.
  • Takes more memory just to sit at a desktop than Win 10, which already also uses way too much.
  • Drive performance is a bit worse on Win 11
  • Not being able to get rid of the search icon by the start button sucks (edit: thanks for the info on where to go to turn this off Necrosaro)
  • The stock “widgets” icon is useless to me and you cant get rid of it by simple “delete” without going through some tweaks.
  • The soon to be shoving of Copilot AI into the OS is going to suck because I don’t care about it (especially having to pay $20/mo to get a useful version of it) and don’t want to use it. One more thing taking up space and RAM
  • The audio setting and mixer is far more complicated and less capable than what you could do in Win 10, and finding a properties menu I was looking for is impossible because you cant even access it anymore unless you know a very specific run command to make it open now.

Thats all I can think off just off the top of my head. AtlasOS fixes half of those at least. Some are simply part of Windows now and nothing you can do.

edit: Also User Account Control can no longer be fully turned off. You turn it all the way down and it says “never notify” yet I have had 2-3 times it pops up since I set it like that. I even checked one time wondering why I was getting a popup to verify I had in fact turned it off.

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I enjoy windows 11 more then 10 actually. However this is only due to Ntlite allowing me to customize my system. 11 customized was better then 10 personally

I don’t know what the future holds in a newer OS(besides being more bloated) but as it stands I maybe stuck with 11 for quite awhile unless something really grabs my attention.

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Small thing, but hell this is something I disable in Win 10. Yeah, think win 10 is the way.

I was able to get rid of mine

The process to hide the search bar is slightly different on Windows 11. To hide the search box, right-click on the taskbar and head over to ‘Taskbar settings’. Now, select Taskbar items to expand the section and toggle the ‘Search’ switch to ‘Off’.

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Egh. The “we can make it better” approach, where technically you can disable the feature, but we will make you summon a few otherwordly entities in the process.

Technical I removed this root and stem with Ntlite but this is at lease a way to hide it if needed.

I am very picky how I like my OS lol

Same here.

This is basically patching the iso, right? No utility from the OS itself?

Wouldn’t mind if Microsoft gave the option to use 3rd party “Desktop Environments”, LXDE or XFCE could give perfect 95/98 era vibes… or CDE just to for fun. CDE could make Windows look like a retro SunOS :wink:

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Honestly? My wish would be to have Linux dev on the same level of importance as windows and os. This is the only thing (I had attempts) that is stoping me from using something like Fedora as my home pc os.

You can do only so much from the iso because you can brick the install but the great thing is you also can do live as well.

This allows you to remove whatever you wish as long as you don’t go too far because there is always things that may break other things you may want.

It’s a powerful app

I was lucky that I built a new machine to give w11 a go. I was able to install my main apps, so it stuck - but was very prepared to revert back to win10 if I suffered in any way.

A few months on now and it’s been very reliable on an AM5 platform.

It was incredibly handy to have the old machine on and still connected to a monitor for anything I forgot… Which I did!

If I only had one machine, I’d be inclined to buy a new drive, unplug the win10 one and do a win11 install on that (if funds permit of course). I’d also use Macrium reflect and make an image for copy and paste convenience of files.

Hope that helps!

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I am suprised ntlite is still kicking and modernized to boot!

Re downgrade → yes, but there is there a point anymore? Microsoft has effectively cut development for 10 years ago and will cut off security soon.

Win 11 is also living on borrowed time apparently (if W12 rumors are true, ditto), and MS is focused on AI first, data vacuuming + advertisement second and user experience last if ever.

If windows search cannot find even fucking edge in start menu, I dont want copilot ai enhanced search exfiltrating my personal data facilitating failure there as well. Only if its guaranteed local inference, which I doubt.

Its free user data, and microsoft has never not reached for it before.

Every personal pain point from win 8 is still there even now, so I have little hope microsoft starts caring anf fixing all the fucking papercuts they have made.
Little happy additions like forced ms accounts, forced updates and ads everywhere are signs of thing to come, and I don’t like picture it paints.

I already dual boot and sinceM365 is perfectly usable for me in browser, my next install is Fedora.

EDIT: I sound like old cranky unix neckbeard, dont I?

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Big bugs surviving from 8 have impacted more functions lately, have three or more “file manager windows” and you’ll have increasing CPU usage on your P-cores. The stupid XBox “recording app”(just a reskinned 8’s capture tool) glitches if you have dual monitors and opt to record a smaller screen.

Themes can randomly glitch and you lose the text in title windows :grimacing:

Everything on the QA side had been pushed aside since 7, even “metro apps” randomly go blank on 11 just like 8/8.1 & 10 until you force quit those apps. I pity those on Windows Education Edition Mode(more locked down S-Mode)

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Yup and ui schizoprenia to boot.

I strongly dislike a lot of new UI, because it simply does not expose a lot critical functionality. And obsufcate old ui on purpose, where its doable.

Its either powershell or start hunting for original XP era configuration menus.

Which is both farcical and insane, if you start doing UI refresh, finish the damn job systematically !

Look at linux community, they are basically beggars compared to both MS dev time manpower and budget wise and they do continuously improve UI and design in all DE.

Just Kde alone has done more in few years than MS in last 20.

EDIT: coming to think about, only personally useful additions since Windows 7 is integrated snipping tool and systemwide dark mode.
All else is pointless for me.

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