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I want to buy my first Motorcycle

I'm going to test drive a 1500cc 1993 Vulkan this weekend, see this one:

http://www.kijiji.ca/v-moto-touring/ville-de-quebec/kawasaki-vulcan-1500cc-1993/1179443780

Might i suggest the Hyosung GV650 Aquila Pro

Its cheap and very reliable. Weighs less than 300 kg and has a 75ps engine so very good power to weight ratio... for a cruiser at least :)

Adjustable footrests, all disc brakes, efi, liquid cooled. It does not have a tach gauge though.

There's nothing second hand of this brand where I live ! I think it's 250cc right?

I'm going to see and maybe test ride this 1994 Virago 1100cc tonight, wish me luck!

http://www.equipemotopro.com/motorcycle-used/YAMAHA/1994-YAMAHA-Virago+1100+Custom-9201922f0a0a00b53075ddd1d7264b06.htm

The number of miles is irrelevant for the most part. It honestly completely depends on the bike, motor, conditions it was rode in, how it was ridden, and most importantly, how it was cared for. Old BMW r and K bikes would laugh at your thought of needing a rebuild at 60km, and are still running like new at 120k miles. Now compare that to a Ducati or Harley at 60k miles that was used for commuting around slow moving traffic around town, and yes, it might be at the end of its life.

As far as size goes, yes smaller is better for a first timer. You can say all you want that the bike only has as much throttle as you want to give it, but the problem is a beginner shouldn't be worrying about that beyond a certain point. Larger bikes require smaller input for faster response, which means a beginner can easily over react and do a lot of harm on a faster bike, whereas the smaller bike might just provide a little scare. So yes, there is merit in starting on a smaller bike. It allows you to focus more on the basic fundamentals more, whereas on a powerful bike, you may be more focused on just not giving it too much power and never know the limits.

So really to sum it up, it depends on YOU. Seriously ask yourself if you could control yourself, if not, then start small if at. Also MAKE SURE you take a riders safety course. Learn how to ride first before buying, and fully realize the risks you are taking.

Riding is a life changing hobby, and an expensive one. It can be life changing in either a positive or negative way, so start right. Realize gear is equally, if not more important than the bike you pick. Poorly selected gear can ruin a ride due to weather, or crashing (it is a matter of when, not if). That means spend money on good gear. Seriously budget at least $1000 MINIMUM for helmet, jacket, gloves, and boots at minimum. If that means you only have $1000 leftover for a bike, then so be it, but make gear a first priority. Also realize bikes are not cheap to run either. While gas and insurance may be cheap, tires and time spent maintaining everything is not. A properly running bike is also a safety consideration.

Once you factor all this in, I would say just shop around, and look for something that stirs your emotions. It doesn't matter past that, because logically, motorcycles make no sense. Emotionally though, they make all the sense in the world, so get out of your head so much when picking past that point, and pick what moves you.

So true. My leather has saved me from having to deal with road rash a time or 2. They also make leather with armor so you can have the best of both worlds.

Definately. For this reason I highly recommend getting an engine guard/highway bars... they reduce the damage to the bike (and also give you a place to put highway pegs for when your legs get tired... and they will get tired on a long ride).

Ok so to sum up, I boight the 1994 xv 1100 (virago) that you see above, the dark purple and beige one!

I rode it for an hour and a half today and it runs great, I really had a great time! Now I'm going to buy a good padded vest and a rain suit and It's on for the summer:)

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Congrats!

I'd recommend starting on something small like a 125cc - 250cc.
It will allow u to get used to riding with out have to worry about too much power.

I found this Guild on first motorcycle to buy useful in selecting a small bike and what to check when buying one used:

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Very intersting. Thanks for your contribution.

Someone will find this information very useful, when they browse this thread, as it is titled for those who are new to buying their first bike.

Also thank you for posting that link. It will help them in the future.

Do you have a specific bike in mind that you would recommend? This would help future users who wish to comment here on this thread.

I'm not sure I fully agree with this assertion that is often made about starting small. I started on a 1200cc BMW cruiser, and though that meant I had to spend some extra time in parking lots getting comfortable I think that overall it was a benefit because I feel comfortable with the power and weight of any bike that I happen to be able to borrow or test out.

Just my two cents. I think that it's more important to find something you like and that you want to ride. You'll be able to get used to the power and weight of any bike out there.

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Discussion. :slight_smile:

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My first bike was a cbr500r. Couldn't ask for a better starting bike and the 300 would have been too small. Could I do it again id had gotten the ninja 600. Slightly more power but still controllable.

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