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Does anyone here still buy DVDs/Blu-rays?


#61

Yeah film can be transferred at higher resolutions and better color and so on. But there are a lot of movies as you say which are filmed at 2k or the cgi/editing whatever digital processing is done was done at a low resolution.

I’m not saying all old movies are up-scaled but a lot of them are, even ones which could be transferred from film with newer formats aren’t because (apparently) its easier to just upscale the old transfer. It’s annoying because often the old blurays look better because they’re not over sharpened. I haven’t seen the terminator 2 4k release but I’ve heard it has so much noise reduction that everything looks like it’s made of plastic.


#62

DVD don’t do 1080p.


#63

resolution is hardly the final word on image quality


#64

I generally try to buy digitally on amazon due to convenience over anything else. TV series are one thing that I still buy on dvd due to cost. I bought the complete Married with Children dvd set for like under 30 bucks. The seasons were 20 bucks a pop digitally.

Blu-ray broke me. It seemed like every fucking time I would use my blue ray player it told me off and wanted me to upgrade. You couldn’t skip the previews like you could on many dvd players. The entire thing was off putting and it never really caught on in computers which also hurt it for me. At least with HD-DVD you had the double sided disks that let you use them on older players. One thing that I loved about video cds and then dvd’s was being able to throw a few disks in a case in my laptop bag. Blu-ray never really caught on as a standard on pcs and well now optical is kinda dead(on laptops more than desktops but still). Means if I’m on a trip I can’t really just go out and grab a movie or two to watch on it.


#65

I still buy discs, but only if it’s a movie or TV show I enjoy watching multiple times.


#66

Yeah, the worst part about bluray is actually playing the things. Unskipable ads and junk in front of a movie are bad enough but the stupid amount of copy protection that just creates a headache for legitimate users and does nothing to stop piracy really makes them unpleasant things to use.


#67

I don´t really see a reason why you should not be allowed to r.i.p. your own blue rays to digital formats unless you resell the blue ray again afterwards, then it´s not quite right.


#68

Which is also actually legal in civilised countries.


#69

Maybe, I just think it´s easy to argue for that to be illegal as you maybe should be required to erase your copy if you sell your copy, since otherwise you kinda just printed a copy that didn´t exist before.

From what I found it seems like in the EU developing and destributing the software to break encryption on blue rays is illegal, but using the software as an individual (as long as you don’t share the resulting copy) is fine. Though, I’m not totally confident making that ‘statement’. Could be wrong.

But that’s one of those things wether or not it’s legal. I just actually don’t even care. At least I paid for the damn thing.


#70

And that’s the way it is.
You are allowed a personal copy for personal use only (i.e. no distribution in any kind of way) - whether that’s digital or physical doesn’t matter.
Of course selling the original also transfers your license to the new owner.
A lot of people seem to confuse or not know about the difference between getting a physical copy and the license.
It’s the same with people saying “I bought my games on GoG so I’m allowed to give them to my friends” - no you’re fucking not. Just because it doesn’t have DRM doesn’t mean you get the rights for distribution. And also people that say/do that are assholes because they are the reason companies put DRM on anything in the first place.

You’re not. It’s the Marijuana dilemma. You’re allowed to consume it, but you’re not allowed to own or distribute it.
It’s a little tricky and different people (read: lawyers) say different things because there hasn’t really been a precedent over it.
Basically it’s technically illegal to break copy protection, but you’re also entitled to a private copy. But one doesn’t go without the other sooooooooo there’s that. Consensus so far is pretty much that breaking the copy protection for private use is OK.


#71

The laws are actually pretty squishy and not universal for every country.
Legal, kinda legal, illegal, legal if no DRM, etc.

How do I morally justify ripping for myself? I do it for myself, nobody else. I don’t distribute, let alone sell. For me it’s a convenience thing as I don’t have to go to the shelf, look for the movie I want to watch, take it out of the case, put it in my ODD, let the ODD spin up, etc. With a rip I can watch it with just a few clicks.
Also, in the case of letting a friend borrow the DVD/Blu Ray I can still watch the movie myself.
If they decide to rip the DVD/Blu ray I borrowed them…none of my business. Libraries who lend out optical media aren’t held responsible either of their members rip the lent optical media.

I fucking pay for my movies/shows/music, thus I should be able to make a backup copy for my convenience.


#72

One of the few people under 19 who probably prefer disks. Having a physical copy just fits me better. Not even against one of those disks that just ask you to install steam, as long as the case is something more than just plastic.

It’s a bit like a collector’s item to me.


#73

I buy UHD HDR BluRay for the movies/documentaries I enjoy the most. No streaming service can compete with the video/audio quality.


#74

Strangely a very good friend of mine buys Blurays regularly for about 5€ each when they’re cheap on amazon or at a store. And he is kinda proud of it.

I haven’t bought any thing round and shiny since 2009 or so. I don’t have any blurays, just a couple of DVDs from 10+ yrs ago.


#75

I do this its worth the money I evenly buy the soundtrack of anime and games as well.