Return to Level1Techs.com

Considering moving company and need some advise

recommendations
#1

Ok, i’m really not sure if this belongs here, but what ever.

A really good friend of mine recently moved on to a new company. We met at my current job, but due to my company not being able to accomodate a position he wanted, he moved on.
Now, he’s telling me to apply for a job at his new company.

For a little insight: I’m a system administrator in a 50 person company. I mostly work with linux servers, Databases/Analysis and internal IT stuff. Currently this involves 90% Webservers for customers, which isn’t really great, but better than working with Windows all day :wink: I can’t really see myself Doing this for the next 10 years or so though.

At the new company there is potential to move on to new stuff. Mostly Ansible and Optimization of existing systems as well as Creating workflows for colleagues. A bit more money might be involved too.

Now the problematic bit. I’m pretty happy with the people i work with. I never complained to my boss that anything wasn’t right. I’m the only one at this company that can do what i currently do. Because of this, i’d feel pretty bad for just leaving. I’m sure that my current employer can’t give me more “interesting” Projects, as we don’t have customers that want that. At the same time, i’ve gotten a lot of what i asked for in the past two years. New position (moved from Servicedesk to what i currently do), I work mostly by myself, and i’m getting decent recognition from my boss. They payed for LPIC Certification and i recently got a three day Docker training.
Going away feels a lot like leaving him hanging with no backup for a plan i don’t know works out.

I know that moving on in IT is common. I’m loyal though and leaving a company that’s giving it’s best to accomodate what i want to do doesn’t feel great. What would you do? Is a bit more money and the potential for a new challenge enough to say “screw it, i’ll never see them again”, or do i stay and try to get more into stuff i want to do in the future?

0 Likes

#2

Well, I know what it feels like working at a company for 13 years and it was mostly trying to better the workflow of the place (albeit with my meager skills). The problem with the job from the start is that I had to wear too many hats. It was a fun challenge at first but I found it frustrating when my progress on the fun part - improving the workflow, was interrupted constantly by sysadmin tasks and the like. Ultimately I’d warn against jobs with hazy job descriptions and things that interest you dangled out like bait. It’s easy to get caught up in ‘the grass is greener on the other side’. I guess in the end though it depends on if you are the type that likes to focus on a project or not.

Plus you do have an advantage in having a friend at that company. If you trust he’ll keep it hush to his employer you really see if you can get some details about the position if you haven’t already. That’s assuming it’s something he’s privy to.

As for loyalty… well I’m of two minds on that. I did work at one company for 13 years after all. However, money is, at the end of the day, the reason for a business. When the fortunes of that company eventually dwindled due to the bubble I was laid off without much in the way of an apology and then cursed at when I gave them “ridiculous” terms when they attempted to bring me in to do contract work because no one could do my job. I simply wanted my money upfront because I knew they were having problems paying out payroll at that point. But I digress. On the other side I did have a good relationship with the original owner of the company and he was rather frank when it came to his dealings with employees. Probably part of the reason I stayed so long. He often said that ‘nobody will care if you worked here when you die, so if you have an opportunity take it’. In return he just asked people to be upfront with him so he could fix something if could be or transition if not. I mean that’s the idea behind the 2 week notice, but because he often let us know ahead of time changes to our position or the company people usually do so in kind. That’s not something you’re going to find very often (or ever) in a corporate setting, but it’s pretty damn nice when you do. I was once escorted out by security when I gave my 2 week notice during a corporate merger because the VP wouldn’t give me any straight answers about my position. Boy was he livid and paranoid I was sabotagng their network. I could have handled it better, but I got fed up.

Sorry, I’ve gotten long winded. At the end of the day business is business. They’re ultimately going to do what they think is best for them (I mean the business) and you should do what’s best for you. If you feel guilty about it brace yourself for any number of reactions and tell your boss that your not happy with your current position. Who knows maybe they want to branch out into new business? Even if they don’t you’ll have given them plenty forewarning. Just be prepared to be escorted out in the worst case and have your own backup plan if that actually happens :stuck_out_tongue:

2 Likes

#3

I appreciate your input. Yes, business is business. In the end though, i’m dealing with humans, a lot of them friends to varying degrees.
There is potential in the company i’m working at now. We are actively looking for new people and i guess there is some way to have a more challenging position in the future.
I’ve also just had my bi-anual meeting with my boss to talk about how stuff is going. The next one will be in December. So i guess i’ll take a really, really close look at what’s going on, what i want and what should change and will talk through all of this in December. That’s also the date to talk about money, so probably a little raise will come in then too.

Overall, i like the place i’m currently in. I’ve been here for over 5 years now. Not a lot of those that where here when i started are left and i feel that experience and persitence have a chance to pay of in the longer run. If it doesn’t i can still move on.

I’ll probably tell my friend that i’m open for suggestions. So if his company has a specific position they need to fill and they feel like i might be a good fit, they can contact me and we’ll talk. Proactively asking for a job doesn’t feel like the right move atm.

This also takes a lot of pressure out of my current job. I do what i do/want to do and if they don’t like it, i can just move on.

1 Like

#4

Well, it sounds like you largely know what you want to do. At the end of the day you do you and it is work so be careful they don’t take advantage of you.

1 Like

#5

Hey Domsch1988

I think you’ve already made up your mind (judging by your post), but I wanted to give you some things to think about.

Firstly, have you considered having a frank discussion with your current manager and say, “Hey, Billy who used to work here has encouraged me to apply for a job at Evil Consolidated, I like working here, but there are these aspects that look good (obviously explain them), I’m wondering what you think I should do”. Obviously the ability to talk to your manager like this depends on your relationship with them.

There’s a lot of questions you need to ask yourself:

  1. What do I lose by making the jump?
  2. What do I gain by making the jump?
  3. Who would my new boss/manager be? What type of personality do they have? Will I get along with them
  4. What does this do for my career?
  5. How long have I worked at my current workplace? What does my employment history look like to others? - it’s not uncommon for some people to jump fairly regularly, but doing so can also be a sign of incompetence and disloyalty.
3 Likes

#6

That’s a much more concise version of what I was more or less trying to say. I’m getting to be a rambling old man :stuck_out_tongue:

1 Like

#7

Tell your boss you want to go to greener pastures, but say that you realize that in doing so, you are hurting the company because, you are the only one that can do what you can do. And therefore you’d be willing to help find a quality drop in replacement. You’d look like a quality guy at the end of the day.

Although, that might take to long. How much time do you have to decide on going to your friends place?

0 Likes