Coding and its relationship with hacking

 how has your knowledge of coding helped in any of your hacking endeavors or the like? Examples of how different coding languages helped you see certain vulnerabilities etc. I appreciate any and all info.
 

Well I am not a coder let us clear that up now. however, my constant fiddling with game ini files enabled me to be very comfortable in a commandline such as linuxes terminal. That is what i used to change my sister's password for her computer. (she asked me too). She was ecstatic that she didn't need to lose everything on the drive.

Well, you can't exactly do this hacking, which you don't seem to understand what it is, without coding. You will need to understand JS, Jquery, PHP, Ruby, Java, C++, C#, Perl, Python, HTML, and so-on to be able to adapt to different situations presented. You need to know how to program and write markup to "hack".

it just seems from some of the reading that I have done that most "hacking" is done with tools and alot of people don't seem to refer to that as hacking and those who do are called skiddies so I guess there is a level beyond just the normal tools people use where a level of coding knowledge is required but my question is what you need this coding to do? what can you do with coding that you can't do with tools? are you using it to make your own tools specific to the situation you need?

"Coding" languages such as C++, java, and others aren't quite that important to "hacking" or "rooting". What you need to learn are the scripting languages like ruby, PHP, javascript, and python. Rooting stuff is quite different from normal programming since you are looking for where a website or program has an open hole which can be any number of things. I never really got into hacking much and I have pretty much backed out of programming entirely, but a lot of my friends are pretty big guys in the hacking scene. As far as the "tools" go such discussion is reserved to hackforums because that is what all the tards and skiddies use.

 

Edit: find yourself a good irc to hop on with those types of people if you want to learn more.

*FacePalm* ... Most Buffer Overflow exploits are coded in C or C++, and yet you say they aren't important? Every computer language plays an important role if you are a "hacker".

forza master anonymous hacker

 

ot: php, python, asm, C*

So, I guess you all mean cracking/evil hacking/breaking computer security with hacking.

You have to understand a system to break it. Most systems in computer science are build with software, so you have to understand the software -> you have to know the programing language. Sometimes you need a realy deep understanding, sometimes not. Just as an example the privilege escalation bug in recent linux kernels http://timetobleed.com/a-closer-look-at-a-recent-privilege-escalation-bug-in-linux-cve-2013-2094/ . It requires you to understand C, a little bit assambler and deeper information about the system.

00110000111000001101001100101001001010101000010110011000001111111000001

Well to be fair there are types of hacking that really don't require knowledge beyond terminal commands and stuff.  Like SQL injections, for instance, or hacking memory addresses.  You're just running basic commands or changing values with that kind of stuff.  

00110110101110011010001010010101 10011010101010010111100110101100 10100101011010010111100110100101

If that's supposed to actually say something, I think you're missing a number somewhere in there.  :P  

One Must also remember that "Hackers" made what the PC Market is today... aka I am talking about "Steve Woz and Capt Crunch" to name a couple of "Hacker"

Hacking websites and databases accessable over the web taught me a whole bunch, not just in web security but in database design, scripting, client-server and all that jazz. Taking apart open-source software helped too, I love Android for that 

 

Hacking can be extremely useful to improving your knowledge, so long as you're not a skiddie or don't think you're an uber leet haxor for making a successful SQL injection. Anyone actually interested in software, go look at some open-source code, it's really useful, and interesting