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Best unbuffered ECC memory for a new Ryzen 3000 build?

#1

Hello, I plan to upgrade my PC to Ryzen Gen 2 after it’s released. I keep my PC on 24h/day and I would really like to get ECC memory. I do both work (C++ and web dev) and gaming (Steam + Proton). Would be good to know that random PC/compiler crashes are not due to memory errors.

I went through a couple of topics on the Ryzen/Threadripper memory modules. There are stories of people being able to overclock their 2666 ECC modules just fine … I would also like to have my ECC RAM stick running stable at around 3000Mhz (which is what I heard is the sweet spot for Ryzen)

Is this a good unbuffered ECC RAM stick? Are there any better ones?

There aren’t whole lot of unbuffered DDR4 ECC memory sticks on Amazon … am I missing anything? What’s the best out there in the US to buy?

PS. I am new to these forums. Hello everybody :slight_smile:

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#2

I’ve got a pair of Kingston KSM26ES8/8ME (8GB unbuffered ECC) running at 3600 CL22 in my 2700X system. Here’s the details

8GB (single rank) sticks generally overclock better than 16GB (dual rank) ones. Although running 2 DIMMs per channel might offset the gain from the single rank sticks. This depends a lot on the motherboard. If you need 64GB on a dual-channel system (2 16GB DIMMs per channel), don’t expect high clocks.

Micron server RAM seems to overclock fairly well in my experience, much better than the consumer stuff (Ballistix etc) at least.

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#3

Thanks for the above. Wow - good job on overclocking to 3600! I will try to find some Kingston sticks as well. Where did you purchase them and for how much?

That said, I do plan to use 16GB sticks as eventually I want 64 GBs of RAM. Overclocking as high as 3600 is not really one of my goals.

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#4

I purchased them at a local store in germany. However, I also recommended those sticks to a friend of mine who purchased them at Mindfactory (german online retailer), he’s getting 3466 on Ryzen 1 with them, so it seems like I didn’t just get lucky with my 2 sticks - most of them seem to be able to overclock that far.

In my Threadripper system, I’m running four Micron MTA18ADF2G72AZ-2G6, overclocked to 2933. I haven’t tried 3200 yet but I guess they’ll run that just fine as well, given that the datasheet even lists a 3200 speed grade for those sticks.

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#5

This is good to know, MicroCenter has tons of Ballistix RAM and I’ve always avoided it.

Now I have a hard/fast reason when someone asks me why :sweat_smile:

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#6

I would highly recommend anyone buying RAM for 3000 series to stick to 1 DIMM per channel, get a dual rank stick instead if you need the capacity. Most, if not all x570 boards will have a daisy-chain memory slot wiring, instead of T-topology, and AFAIK using daisy-chain is the AMD official guidance for board vendors. So I am taking that as an indication that the memory controller is optimized for daisy-chain, and daisy-chain is known for performing poorly in 2 DIMM per channel configurations, but very well in 1 DIMM per channel. (T-topology is a compromise)

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#7

I wouldn’t buy ram ahead of time. I have a feeling that some newer faster ram is on the way and will launch near the same time. This will change ram pricing .

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#8

Have they given an official answer of the recommended ram speed yet? Iirc Wendell gave a range, but that is probably for overclocking now that they decoupled the FSB… err infinity clock from the memory clock. Either way going to be pricey I bet. I have some sub 2400 DDR4 ECC I bought for a NAS a few years ago. Don’t even want to know how much faster sticks would run.

Somewhat offtopic, but does anyone else find it annoying how amazon product pages for memory sometimes have conflicting model numbers or specs? I’m guessing it’s due to 3rd party sellers making changes? /shrug. Maybe they’re doing better now, but in the past I refused to buy from them because I couldn’t be sure what I was ordering.

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#9

At the risk of getting off topic, that is exactly what’s going on at Amazon.

I work for a company that does third party selling on Amazon, even so far as to make our in-house procedures for it. Their catalog is a mess because sellers all have slightly different ideas what goes there; Amazon uses this information, and frankensteins together an ad page based around a combination of these ads.

If their return policy wasn’t basically “Sure!”, this would be a huge problem.

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