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AMD 3000 E class?

#1

Has anyone heard any news on a possible release or more info on AMD 3000 series E class Ryzen processors?

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#2

Not yet but it would make sense, lot’s of folks bought E series during the FX days and were very happy with them

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#3

I don’t think Ryzen needs that honestly. The low end 6-core of the 3000 series is already … 50 watts I think? 65W. (Must have seen the 50W number in some leaks before…)

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#4

A 65w 12/16 core part would be great providing the 1/2/4 boost clocks where high.

Eg a16 core part with all core boost at 3GHz is as useful as a 3.8GHz one for many applications. Compiling springs to mind.

If I was to compare my E5 2660 v2 (2.6 all core) to a make’s i7-7700k, they are both similar in raw perf per watt but the xeon is much better in heavily multi threaded applications.

This makes me wonder what the sweet spot for perf/watt is for ryzen 3000.

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#5

The Ryzen E-class chips are typically 45w TDP part CPUs. The one I was looking at 2500E:

of CPU Cores: 6

of Threads: 12

Max Boost Clock: 4GHz
Base Clock: 3.1GHz
Thermal Solution: Not included
Default TDP / TDP: 45W

I’m looking for a replacement for a A8-6700 APU that was a oh crap repair when my FX-6300 died in my home server during a move. This home virtualization server should be at lease 6 cores with ECC RAM support. I’d love to get a ryzen pro CPU, but those are only sold to OEMs. So I’m stuck with unverified ECC support. I won’t touch Intel because the cost to get a (server class) mobo with ECC support and a CPU with ECC support, is at least close to 2x cost of what AMD can do it in.

This time around, I’m much more sensitive to power consumption too. So the E-class makes sense. Now that AMD has 7nm dies, I really want to see what they do with that bigger performance/core/TDP envelope in their power efficient desktop CPUs.

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#6

There is a difference between making a CPU more efficient and just making it slower. The 65W parts are pretty much in the sweet spot and Ryzen is already crazy efficient.

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#7

The 65W TDP of Ryzen is measured at full Boost Clocks. They will draw significantly less in idle or low load scenarios.
Lower TDP CPU’s don’t use less power for the same amount of Horses. They are “just” downclocked. You can downclock and undervolt a Ryzen to achieve similar maximum Powerdraw.

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